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Veg Seeds A-Z

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  1. Daisy Gourd

    DAISY GOURD

    Make an exclusive bouquet out of the daisy inlaid gourds. Shades of greens, oranges, yellows, and whites provide a colorful decorative assortment of cute little gourds ready for a table top. 10 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  2. Gourd Mix

    GOURD MIX

    Includes all varieties listed plus some others in a ratio of 40% small to 60% large. In Native American culture gourds were grown for eating and utensils. When cured, they were made into dippers, bowls, even baby rattles. Plants are extremely vigorous, covering a lot of ground--some of our vines even took to the trees. In general, these gourds require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. See individual gourd descriptions for drying instructions. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  3. Luffa Gourd

    LUFFA GOURD

    Grow this gourd for your own sponges and scrubbers. Requires a long season so these should be started indoors. The luffa seeds should be scarified (lightly sanded) with an emery board or sand paper and soaked in room temperature water overnight or up to 24 hrs prior to planting for best results. In general, gourd plants are extremely vigorous, covering a lot of ground--some of our vines even took to the trees. Gourds require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Luffa gourds should be harvested when the outer shell is dry, the gourd is light in weight, and the seeds rattle inside. After harvest you cut off the stem end of the gourd and shake out the seeds. The next step is to soak the luffa gourd in warm water to soften the outer skin so it can be easily removed. The last step is to soak the fibrous sponge in a bleach solution (one part bleach to 9 parts water) to give the luffa a creamy-white color. Rinse in clean water and allow to dry before using. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  4. Corsican Gourd

    CORSICAN GOURD

    This saucer shaped gourd is used to make dishes measuring about 8-9 inches round, squat, and 3-4 inches tall. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Lagenaria or hard-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and can take one to six months, depending on the size of the fruit. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken, it is ready for painting, waxing, or shellacking. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  5. Penguin Gourd

    PENGUIN GOURD

    Direct from the frozen ice flows of the Southern Ocean comes this Penguin to your garden. Also known as a "Calabash", these gourds are 5 inches in diameter, 12 inches long, and shaped like a penguin. The light green skin cures to a tan color. Ideal for craft projects as a little black and white paint turns this gourd into a penguin easily. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Lagenaria or hard-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and can take one to six months, depending on the size of the fruit. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken, it is ready for painting, waxing, or shellacking. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  6. Dinosaur Gourd

    DINOSAUR GOURD

    An average sized green gourd with both wing-like projections and a curving, graceful neck. In Native American culture gourds were grown for eating and utensils. When cured, they were made into dippers, bowls, even baby rattles. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Lagenaria or hard-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and can take one to six months, depending on the size of the fruit. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken, it is ready for painting, waxing, or shellacking. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  7. Birdhouse Gourd

    BIRD HOUSE GOURD

    Large, bulbous body with narrow neck 12 to 15 inches long. Grown on a trellis for straight necks, this gourd is ideal for birdhouses or other crafts. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Lagenaria or hard-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and can take one to six months, depending on the size of the fruit. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken, it is ready for painting, waxing, or shellacking. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  8. Yugoslavian Fingers Gourd

    YUGOSLAVIAN FINGERS GOURD

    A pretty unique gourd, Yugoslavian Fingers appears as a big, creamy goose egg with 8-10 pointed fingers protruding from all around. This is a Cucurbita or soft-skinned type, can be eaten when young, and they are delicious. Mature and dried you will get a lot of comments on the fingers. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. Cucurbita or soft-skinned gourds can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and takes about a month. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken it is ready for painting or crafting. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  9. Autumn Wings Gourd

    AUTUMN WINGS GOURD

    Very hard to describe, it looks kind of like a tropical fish. The gourds are divided by 5 or 6 double fins or wings. Some are straight necked and others are curved. The colors range from creams and yellows to whites and greens and most are about 6 to 8 inches long. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. You'll get comments on this one. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Cucurbita or soft-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and takes about a month. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken it is ready for painting or crafting. 5 seeds Treated Seeds Learn More
    $1.75

  10. Koshare Gourd

    KOSHARE GOURD**SOLD OUT**

    A small dipper shaped gourd with random green and yellow bands. This semi-bush plant produces very abundantly. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Cucurbita or soft-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and takes about a month. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken it is ready for painting or crafting. 25 seeds. Learn More

    Regular Price: $1.75

    Special Price: $0.00

    Out of stock

  11. BLISTER GOURD (120 days)

    BLISTER GOURD (120 days)

    Liven up Autumn displays with this light green colored gourd exploding with blisters. It is apple shaped, grows to a 9 x 12 inch size and weighs 4-7 pounds. Gourd plants are extremely vigorous and require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Lagenaria or hard-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and can take one to six months, depending on the size of the fruit. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken, it is ready for painting, waxing, or shellacking. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

  12. Crown of Thorns Gourd

    SHENOT CROWN OF THORNS GOURD

    Cream colored gourd, oval with distinctive thorns at one end. In Native American culture gourds were grown for eating and utensils. When cured, they were made into dippers, bowls, even baby rattles. Plants are extremely vigorous, covering a lot of ground--some of our vines even took to the trees. In general, these gourds require a long, warm growing season, ranging from 95 to 120 days to maturity. Gourds are ready for harvest when the stems dry and turn brown. Harvest before a frost. This is a Cucurbita or soft-skinned gourd and can be dried in a two step process, taking 1 to six months depending on the size of the gourd. First you must clean and dry the outside surface, wiping with alcohol will ensure the surface dries completely. Place the clean gourd in a dark, well ventilated area for about a week, turning and checking daily. Discard any fruit showing any signs of decay or soft spots, do not allow other fruit to touch. After about a week, the outer skin of the gourd should be well dried. Internal drying is the second step and takes about a month. Providing warmth will hasten the curing process and discourage decay. Keep in a dark, well ventilated area and wipe away any mold that appears with bleach. As long as the gourd is hard, it should be fine. Check often and turn so that it will dry evenly. When the gourd is light in weight and you can hear seeds rattling inside when shaken it is ready for painting or crafting. 25 seeds. Learn More
    $1.75

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